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Can Constipation Cause Fever?

Updated: May 13


Can Constipation Cause Fever? - A man holding his stomach.

A lot of us have had to deal with constipation at some point, and it can be a real pain. You might be wondering, can constipation cause fever? While constipation itself doesn't cause a fever, having both constipation and a fever could be a sign of a different health issue. Let's take a closer look at constipation, fever, and when it's important to talk to a doctor.


Understanding Constipation


What is Constipation?

Constipation is when you have trouble going to the bathroom and can't empty your bowels like you normally would. It happens when the waste in your body moves too slowly through your digestive system. This can make your poop hard, dry, and difficult to pass.


Causes of Constipation

Several factors can contribute to constipation, including:


Low Fiber Diet

Fruits and vegetables have something called fiber in them. Fiber helps make your poop softer and easier to go to the bathroom. If you don't eat enough fiber, your poop can get hard and it can be harder to go to the bathroom. Eating lots of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can help you avoid constipation and keep your body healthy.


Dehydration

Your body needs lots of water to keep your digestive system working well. If you don't drink enough water, your body takes water from your poop, making it hard and difficult to come out. This can make you feel uncomfortable and make it harder to go to the bathroom. Make sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day to help your body stay hydrated and your digestive system running smoothly!


Lack of Physical Activity

Being active helps the muscles in your stomach work better to push poop out of your body. If you don't move around much or exercise, it might make it harder for your body to poop because the muscles aren't working as well. This can lead to constipation, which can make you feel uncomfortable. Try to be active every day to keep your body healthy and help your digestive system work better! You can play outside, go for a walk, or do some exercises at home to keep your body moving and your poop moving too!


Certain Medications

Some medications, such as opioids, certain antidepressants, antacids containing aluminum or calcium, and iron supplements, can cause constipation as a side effect. These medicines can make your poop hard or slow things down in your stomach. If you're taking one of these medicines and have trouble going to the bathroom, tell a doctor or nurse so they can help you find a way to feel better.


Ignoring the Urge

Your body knows when it's time to poop, and it's important to listen to it. If you don't go to the bathroom when you need to, it can make your poop get hard and stuck inside. It's important to listen to your body and use the bathroom when you feel the need to help maintain a healthy digestive system and avoid discomfort.


Changes in Routine

Our body likes having a regular routine, and changes in that routine can sometimes cause constipation. If we do something different, like going on a trip or changing when we eat or sleep, our body might need some time to get used to it. Give your body some time to adjust to these changes, and try to stick to a routine as much as possible. Drink lots of water and eat healthy foods to help keep your digestive system working well during these changes.


Medical Conditions

Some health conditions like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), thyroid problems, diabetes, or nerve issues can affect the digestive system and cause constipation. These conditions may slow down the movement of stool in the intestines or affect the muscles that help with bowel movements. If you have constipation and one of these health problems, talk to your doctor. They can help you find ways to make your digestive system work better or give you medicine to help.


Symptoms of Constipation

Symptoms of fever may include:


Infrequent Bowel Movements

If you're not pooping as much as you usually do or if you go a few days without pooping, it might mean you're constipated. Everyone's body is different, so some people might poop more or less often than others. But if you notice a big change in how often you're pooping, it's a good idea to talk to your doctor.


Hard or Dry Stools

Having hard, dry, and difficult-to-pass stools is a common sign of constipation. You might feel like you need to strain or push hard when trying to use the bathroom. To help avoid constipation, drink lots of water, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, and stay active. If the problem continues, it's a good idea to talk to your doctor about other solutions.


Straining During Bowel Movements

Don't push too hard when you're trying to poop, or it might make constipation worse. It's better to relax and wait for your body to do what it needs to do. Pushing too hard can make it more difficult to go to the bathroom and can make you uncomfortable.


Feeling of Incomplete Evacuation

Even after going to the bathroom, you may still feel like there's more poop to come out. This is called an incomplete evacuation and it's a common symptom of constipation. It's like feeling hungry even after eating a meal.  If you feel like you still need to go to the bathroom after you've already gone, talk to a doctor to see if they can help. They might be able to figure out what's going on and give you some tips to help you feel better.


Abdominal Discomfort

Constipation can sometimes make your stomach feel uncomfortable. You might feel some pain or cramps, like when you have a stomachache. Your stomach might also feel full or heavy, like when you've eaten a lot of food. These are all signs that your digestive system might be having some trouble. If your stomach feels uncomfortable, try drinking some water, eating some healthy foods, and talking to a doctor if it doesn't get better. They might be able to help you figure out what's going on and feel better.


Nausea

Constipation can sometimes cause nausea, which is an unpleasant feeling in your stomach that can make you feel queasy or like you might vomit. This can happen due to the buildup of stool and gas in the digestive system. If you feel queasy or nauseous, try to drink some water, eat some healthy foods, and talk to a doctor if it doesn't go away. They can help you feel better and figure out how to make your digestive system work better.


Loss of Appetite

When you're constipated, you might not feel like eating much or have a small appetite. This is because constipation can cause discomfort and bloating, which can make you feel full even if you haven't eaten much. Even though it might be tough, try to eat regular meals and drink lots of water to help your digestive system run smoothly. If you're having trouble eating, it's important to let your doctor know so they can help you find ways to feel better and stay healthy.


Understanding Fever


What is Fever?

Fever is a natural response from your body when it's fighting off sickness or infection. It's a sign that your body is working hard to protect you from harmful things like germs. Your body temperature rises above the normal range when you have a fever.


Causes of Fever

Fever can be caused by various factors, including:


Infections

Sometimes, when you're sick with something like the flu, a cold, a UTI, or strep throat, your body temperature goes up. This is because your body is trying to fight off the germs that are making you sick. While they're busy fighting, your body gets warmer than usual. So, if you have a fever, remember that it means your body is working hard to get better!


Inflammatory Conditions

Some health problems like rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease can cause parts of your body to become irritated or swollen. This is called inflammation. When your body has inflammation, it might react by making your temperature go up, giving you a fever. This is just your body's way of dealing with these health issues.


Heat Exhaustion or Heat Stroke

If you spend too much time in the hot sun or in a very hot place, your body might have trouble cooling down. This can make you feel very sick, with something called heat exhaustion or heat stroke. When this happens, your body temperature can get very high.


Medications

Some medicines can give you a fever as a side effect. Antibiotics, which help fight infections, are one example. Medicines that help with mental health issues or seizures can also make your temperature rise. If you're taking any medicine and notice you have a fever, tell your doctor so they can make sure you're safe and help you feel better.


Cancer

Sometimes, having a fever can be a sign of cancer, like leukemia or lymphoma. When cancer cells grow and move around in your body, they can make your body react with a fever. You might also feel really tired or lose weight because of cancer.


Autoimmune Disorders

Sometimes, your body's own defense system called the immune system, can get confused and attack your own body instead of protecting it. This is called an autoimmune disorder. Two examples are lupus and vasculitis. When this happens, it can cause swelling and make your body feel hot, like when you have a fever. This is because your body is trying to protect itself from something it thinks is harmful, but it's actually not.


Other Medical Conditions

Many different health issues can make you feel hot or give you a fever. Some examples are problems with your blood, like blood clots, problems with your thyroid, or other things that make parts of your body swell up. If you feel hot or feverish and think you might have one of these problems, talk to your doctor. They can help figure out why you feel that way and find the best way to make you feel better. It's important to pay attention to your body and let your doctor know if you feel something is wrong.


Symptoms of Fever

Here are some common symptoms you might experience when you have a fever:


Elevated Body Temperature

When you have a fever, the main sign is that your body temperature goes up higher than normal. Normal body temperature is usually around 98.6°F (37°C), and we say you have a fever when your temperature is 100.4°F (38°C) or higher. So, if you feel hot or unwell and take your temperature, and it's higher than 100.4°F (38°C), that means you have a fever, and your body is trying to tell you something might be wrong.


Chills and Shivering

When you have a fever, you might feel really cold and start shivering, even if the room isn't cold. This happens because your body is trying to make more heat to match your higher temperature. So, even though you might feel cold, remember that you have a fever and need to take care of yourself to feel better.


Headache

Sometimes when you have a fever, your head might hurt, like when you have a headache. This pain can feel different for different people – it might be a little annoying or really strong and bothersome. When your head hurts along with having a fever, it can make you feel more sick and more tired overall.


Muscle Aches and Weakness

When you have a fever, your muscles might feel sore and weak, kind of like how your body feels when you have a cold or the flu. This can make you feel tired and not want to move around much. Make sure to rest and take it easy when you have a fever and sore muscles.


Fatigue and Weakness

When you have a fever, you might feel really tired and weak. Your body is working hard to fight off the underlying cause of the fever, which can leave you feeling drained and fatigued.


Loss of Appetite

When you have a fever, you might not feel like eating much. Your stomach might feel a little upset or queasy, and you might not have much of an appetite. It's okay not to feel like eating as much as usual when you're not feeling well, but try to drink plenty of water and eat a little bit of something healthy if you can. Just like when you're not feeling well, you might not want to eat a big meal.


Sweating

When your body is working hard to cool down during a fever, you might start to sweat. This can make you feel a little uncomfortable and clammy. This is your body's way of cooling down and getting your temperature back to normal. It might not be the most pleasant feeling, but it's a good thing because it means your body is trying to get better. Remember to drink plenty of water to replace the sweat you lose.


Increased Heart Rate

When you have a fever, your body is working really hard to fight off whatever is making you sick, and sometimes that can make your heart beat faster. Your heart beats faster to help your blood move around your body and help it stay at a good temperature. So, if you feel like your heart is beating faster than usual when you have a fever, it's because your body is trying to help you get better.


Dehydration

If you have a fever, you might sweat a lot or breathe more heavily than usual. This can cause you to lose a lot of water from your body, which can make you feel even more tired and weak. It's important to drink plenty of water when you have a fever to replace the water you're losing. Dehydration, or not having enough water in your body, can make your symptoms worse.


Can Constipation Cause Fever?

Constipation can cause discomfort and other digestive symptoms, but it is unlikely to directly cause fever. Fever is generally caused by an underlying infection or inflammatory condition, so it is important to talk to your doctor if you have constipation and fever at the same time. Sometimes, other medical conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease can cause constipation and a fever. Your doctor can find out if you have one of these and give you the right treatment to feel better. Always let your doctor know if you feel sick so they can help!


Treatment Options

When it comes to treating constipation, the goal is to help your bowels move more regularly and comfortably. Here are some options:


1. Dietary Changes

To help with constipation, one of the first things you can do is change what you eat. Try to eat more foods that have a lot of fiber in them, like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans. Fiber helps make your stool softer, so it's easier to go to the bathroom.


2. Hydration

Getting enough water is really important to help your digestive system work well. When you drink lots of water, it helps make your poop softer, so it's easier to go to the bathroom. Try to drink water throughout the day, and remember to drink extra if you're playing a lot or it's really hot outside.


3. Laxatives

If dietary changes and hydration aren't enough, there are over-the-counter laxatives available. These come in different forms and work in various ways to help you go to the bathroom. But it's important to use them as directed and not rely on them too much.


4. Stool Softeners

Sometimes, your stool can get really hard, making it difficult to pass. Stool softeners can help by adding moisture to your stool, making it softer and easier to go.


5. Enemas or Suppositories

If your constipation is really bad, your doctor might suggest using something called an enema or a suppository to help you poop. These are special methods that can make it easier to go to the bathroom. But remember, you should only use these with the help of your doctor or a nurse, and only use them for a short time. Your doctor will tell you how long to use them and will help make sure they're working right for you.


6. Prescription Medications

If over-the-counter options don't work, your doctor might prescribe stronger medications to help with constipation. These stronger medicines can work better, but make sure to be careful with them and follow the doctor's instructions.


7. Lifestyle Changes

Being active and getting exercise can help make your digestion better. When you move your body, it helps get things moving inside too. This makes it easier for you to go to the bathroom. Try to play and be active every day to help your body stay healthy. You don't have to do anything too hard – just running around, playing games, or going for a walk can help. When you exercise, your body gets stronger, and it's good for your digestion too!


8. Biofeedback Therapy

If you have trouble with constipation a lot and other things don't help, there's something called biofeedback therapy that might work. This is when you learn how to use the muscles near your bottom better, so you can go to the bathroom more easily. In biofeedback therapy, a special doctor or nurse helps you learn to control your muscles by showing you what they're doing on a computer screen. You can see when you're using the right muscles and learn to make them stronger.


Prevention

Prevention is all about taking proactive steps to keep your digestive system running smoothly. Here's what you can do:


1. Eat More Fiber

One of the best ways to keep your digestive system running smoothly is to eat plenty of fiber-rich foods. That means loading up on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes. Fiber adds bulk to your stool and helps it move through your intestines more easily.


2. Stay Hydrated

Drinking enough water is crucial for preventing constipation. Water helps soften your stool, making it easier to pass. Aim to drink at least 8 glasses of water a day, and more if you're exercising or it's hot outside.


3. Get Moving

Being active is not only good for your heart and muscles, but it also helps your digestion. When you move around, the muscles in your stomach get moving too, which makes it easier for your body to get rid of waste. So, remember to play, walk, run, or do other activities to keep your body moving and your digestion happy.


4. Establish a Routine

Your body works best when you do things at the same time every day, like eating meals, sleeping, and going to the bathroom. Try to find a time of day when you can sit on the toilet and give your body a chance to poop. It's a good idea to do this after you eat because that's when your body is most ready to go. By setting up a routine for going to the bathroom, your body will learn when it's time to poop and make it easier for you. Try to use the toilet at about the same time every day and see if that helps you feel better!


5. Listen to Your Body

If you feel like you need to go to the bathroom, try not to hold it in. Waiting too long or ignoring the feeling can lead to constipation. It's important to pay attention to what your body is telling you and go to the bathroom when you need to. This will help keep your digestion working well and prevent you from feeling uncomfortable.


6. Watch What You Eat

Foods that are processed or have lots of added sugars can make it harder for your body to digest and cause constipation. Try to eat fewer of these kinds of foods, like candy, chips, and fast food. Instead, eat more whole foods that are good for your body, like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and proteins like chicken, fish, or beans. These foods have lots of good stuff that helps your body work well. Eating healthier foods will make it easier for your body to digest and help prevent constipation.


7. Manage Stress

Feeling stressed or worried can cause problems for your digestion, which might make you constipated. It's important to find ways to feel more relaxed and happy. You can try activities like meditation, yoga, deep breathing, or simply taking time for yourself. Doing things that make you feel good can help you feel less stressed and keep your digestion working well. So, find things you enjoy and make time for them every day!


When to See a Doctor

Sometimes, constipation can be a sign that something else is going on in your body, so it's important to know when to talk to a doctor. Here are some times when you should ask for help:


  • Persistent Constipation: If you've been constipated for over two weeks and nothing seems to be helping, like changing your food or using medicine from the store, it's a good idea to talk to a doctor. They can help you find out why you're constipated and give you better ways to feel better.

  • Severe Symptoms: If you're feeling really sick along with being constipated, like having bad stomach pain, throwing up, seeing blood when you go to the bathroom, or losing weight for no reason, it's super important to see a doctor right away. These could be signs of something more serious, so you need a doctor to check it out and help you get better. Don't wait—go to the doctor if you're feeling really sick!

  • Sudden Changes in Bowel Habits: If you notice that your bowel habits change suddenly, like going from being constipated to having diarrhea, or if your poop looks very different than usual, it's important to tell your doctor. These changes can be a sign that something isn't right in your stomach, and the doctor can help figure out what's going on.

  • Family History of Colon Cancer: If someone in your family has had colon cancer before, or if you're over 50 years old, it's important to pay attention to any changes in how you go to the bathroom. Sometimes, constipation can be a sign of colon cancer, especially for older people. Make sure to tell your doctor if anyone in your family has had colon cancer and get checked regularly. Your doctor can help you know how often to get checked and can help keep you healthy. They can check to make sure everything is okay and take care of any problems early on.

  • Other Medical Conditions: If you have other health problems like diabetes, problems with your thyroid, or problems with your nerves, these can sometimes make your digestion work differently. If you have these kinds of health problems and you notice changes in how you poop, make sure to tell your doctor. They can help figure out if your health problems are causing the changes and give you ideas to feel better.

  • Medication Side Effects: Sometimes, medicines that we take for other problems can make it hard to go to the bathroom. If you think your medicine might be causing constipation, talk to your doctor. They might be able to give you a different medicine or help you find ways to feel better. So don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions and let them know if you think your medicine might be causing problems. They can help you find a solution that works best for you.

  • Pregnancy: When you're pregnant, it's common to have trouble going to the bathroom because of changes in your body and the baby growing inside. But if it's really hard to go, or you can't go for a long time, it's important to talk to your doctor. Your doctor can give you ideas to help you feel better and make sure everything is okay. So don't be shy about talking to your doctor if you're having trouble going to the bathroom while you're pregnant. They can help you feel more comfortable and keep you and the baby healthy.

  • Fever: If you feel very constipated and also have a fever, it might mean you have an infection or something else wrong in your body. The fever is not caused by the constipation, but both could be signs of another problem. If this happens, make sure to see a doctor quickly so they can find out why you have a fever and help you feel better.


Are you experiencing persistent constipation, fever, or other concerning symptoms? Visit us at Center One Medical today! Our team of healthcare professionals is here to provide expert care and effective solutions tailored to your needs. Don't let constipation hold you back – contact us and schedule your appointment now. Take the first step towards better health and well-being.


Conclusion

In conclusion, constipation and fever are different health problems, but sometimes they can be connected. For example, if you're very constipated and your poop gets stuck, it might cause a fever because your body is trying to fight the problem. It's important to know about these things and to pay attention to your body. If you have constipation and a fever, don't wait—see a doctor to find out what's happening and get help. By learning more about your body and paying attention to how you feel, you can make good choices to stay healthy and get help when you need it.



FAQs


1. Can constipation cause fever in children?

  • Yes, children can get a fever from being constipated, especially if their poop gets really stuck inside. Parents should watch their children's bathroom habits and see a doctor if the child has trouble pooping for a while.

2. What are the other complications of severe constipation?

  • Severe constipation can cause other issues like painful swollen bumps (hemorrhoids), bottom skin tears (anal fissures), a feeling of your bottom coming out (rectal prolapse), and poop accidents (fecal incontinence).

3. Is fever always a symptom of constipation?

  • A fever isn't always caused by constipation. There are lots of reasons you might have a fever, so don't always assume it's because of constipation. Talk to a doctor to find out what's causing your fever.

4. Can dehydration contribute to both constipation and fever?

  • Yes, not drinking enough water can cause both constipation and fever. Make sure to drink plenty of water during the day to help keep your body working well and to try to avoid these problems.

5. Are there any natural remedies for constipation and fever?

  • Drinking lots of water and eating healthy foods with fiber can help prevent constipation. But if you have a fever, these things might not be enough to help. It's a good idea to talk to a doctor or nurse, who can help figure out why you have a fever and what kind of treatment you need.

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